Try strength training. Most people are aware that exercise is beneficial for everybody, and especially for diabetics. However, often the emphasis is put on cardiovascular exercises. These stamina-building aerobic activities are an important part of a good exercise regime, but don't forget to include some strength training. Strength training has been shown to reduce the amount of fat found inside the body cavity, surrounding your organs making it just as heart-healthy as traditional cardiovascular exercises.

To stay on top of your blood sugar levels, check for blood sugar drops after exercise. Exercising can affect your glucose levels even after it's over. That's because the glucose used during long exercise periods comes from your liver, and after you use it up, your body will later try to restore it. If you don't eat around the time your body tries to do this, the level of sugar in your blood will drop. It's a good idea to check your blood sugar every 45 minutes after exercising to make sure you can take action to correct any imbalances.

If you skip meals, the glucose in your blood will go up because your liver starts creating glucose for your body because you aren't nourishing yourself adequately. Eating meals regularly, and having snacks with carbs, can reduce the glucose that's released.

Avoid alcohol. Alcohol is a carbohydrate, breaking down very quickly into sugars, having a negative effect on your blood sugar levels. It acts in the same way as chocolate, quickly elevating the blood sugar and then quickly dropping it back down. This can cause symptoms such as weakness, dizziness and sweating. Alcohol can also result in dehydration, which in turn increases the concentration of sugar in the bloodstream. This can have an impact on the effectiveness of your insulin dosage.